• Main Street across from Thompson Hall at UNH Durham campus.
    Sierra Club Ranks UNH Second Coolest School in the Country

    The University of New Hampshire is the second coolest school according to the Sierra Club’s 2018 Cool Schools list.

    Click here to learn more.

  • Two students giving a high-five
    Inside the Push to Bring Racial Equity to Land Grant Universities

    "An underdog campaign is being waged among America’s public andland-grantt universities to address their history of racism and to prioritize the issues of racial equity and food justice."

    Learn more!

  • Sustainability Indicator Management & Analysis Platform (SIMAP) logo
    UNH launches SIMAP

    We're excited to launch the Sustainability Indicator Management & Analysis Platform (SIMAP). SIMAP is a comprehensive footprint-reporting tool that offers campuses a simple and affordable online platform for tracking, calculating, and reporting their carbon and nitrogen footprints. 

    Click here to learn more about SIMAP.

  • STARS Platinum Seal
    UNH Earns Highest National Rating for Sustainability

    We are thrilled to announce that UNH has achieved a Platinum rating for sustainability.  Thank you for making our campus a sustainable learning community!

    Click here to read the press release.

STARS Platinum seal

 

Awards & Accolades

UNH is a leader in sustainability.

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Sustainability Dual Major

Open to all undergraduate from any UNH college or major.

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Waste & Recycling

Help make UNH a zero waste place.

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Events

October
17

NRESS Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM

2:30 PM to 3:30 PM - James Hall, G46: NRESS PhD Program Fall 2018 Environmental Sciences Seminar Series presents "This Microbial Life: New Perceptions of our Microbial World", a mini-series within the seminar series. We welcome the second of four speakers in this mini-series:Dr. Christopher Fernandez, Postdoctoral Associate, Univiversity of MinnesotaDo Mycorrhizal Fungi Increase or Decrease Carbon Stored in Forest Soils?The majority of land plants form symbiotic associations with mycorrhizal fungi, who play an essential role in plant nutrition and productivity. In forest ecosystems, trees allocate considerable amounts of carbon to ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi in exchange for access to growth limiting nutrients found in the soil. Because of the dominance of EM fungi in many forest soils, the activity of these symbiotic fungi has long been hypothesized to disproportionately influence carbon and nutrient cycling in these soils. However, our understanding of the functional diversity of these fungi and the magnitude and direction of their influence on these processes is relatively poor. Additionally, mounting evidence suggests that EM fungal communities and their functional roles are highly responsive to global change. Because these fungi act as key mediators in both forest carbon and nutrient cycles, understanding the consequences of these changes has become a critical area of research in order to better predict effects on forest biogeochemical cycles. I will present findings from multiple projects that are focused on the traits of EM fungi, their role in community structure, potential effects oncarbon sequestration in forest soils in the context of global climate change.
October
24

NRESS Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM

2:30 PM to 3:30 PM - James Hall, G46: NRESS PhD Program Fall 2018 Environmental Sciences Seminar Series presents "This Microbial Life: New Perceptions of our Microbial World", a mini-series within the seminar series. We welcome the third of four speakers in this mini-series: Dr. Ed Hall, Assistant Professor, Ecosystem Science and Sustainability, Colorado State UniversityThe Causes and Consequences of Microbial BiomassThe increasing understanding of earth’s microbiome has led to unprecedented clarity of the important ways in which microbial communities influence a range of societally relevant systems (agricultural and cropping systems, human health, the built environment). At the same time the increased information on the unseen majority has peeled back the cover on the exceptional complexity of the earth’s microbiome. In the past two years we have increased the number of known phyla of all life by as much as a third, estimated that there are a trillion microbial species on the planet and the revised the best estimates of total planetary microbial biomass to just under 100 GT (~50 times that of all animal biomass combined). Because living organisms share a common biochemistry, understanding the causes and consequences of the biochemistry of microbial biomass is one way to constrain the complexity of the diversity of nature and provides an avenue to better understand how microrganisms contribute to many fundamental ecosystem processes. In this talk I will discuss work from my lab on stoichiometric trait distributions of bacterial populations and communities, the influence of microbial metabolism on glacial dissolved organic matter, and how changes in the microbiome due to metal stress may alter food webs of a stream ecosystem. The shared biochemistry of life on earth may be one of the great unifying principals to help us understand the complexity of the interaction between the biosphere and the chemosphere of the planet.
October
31

NRESS Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM

2:30 PM to 3:30 PM - James Hall, G46: NRESS PhD Program Fall 2018 Environmental Sciences Seminar Series presents"This Microbial Life: New Perceptions of our Microbial World", a mini-series within the seminar series. We welcome the last of four speakers in this mini-series: Dr. Lynne Boddy, Professor of Biosciences, Cardiff University, United KingdomAre Only Macrobes at Risk of Extinction?Microbes have greater biomass and genetic diversity than all other organisms on the planet – they are the unseen majority. Plants are intimately dependent on them, and without microbes life would not exist. So should we care if microbes become extinct? Some may adhere to the BaasBecking idea that all microbes are everywhere – the environment selects, and would therefore say that the risk of extinction is negligible. However, this idea is demonstrably not true, so microbial conservation is important, yet in mainstream conservation journals only 2% of papers relate to microbes, and then often to those which pose a threat to macro-organisms. In this talk I will give examples of threatened microbes, especially fungi, and consider the difficulties facing microbial conservation and progress towards getting microbes on an equal footing with plants and animals in the conservation agenda. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

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University of New Hampshire, Sustainability Institute

The Sustainability Institute brings diverse people and ideas together to make the university a model sustainable learning community that reaches beyond campus to engage state, regional, national, and international partners to advance sustainable solutions.

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